Note: Please understand that this website is not affiliated with the Elizabeth Arden company in any way, it is only a reference page for collectors and those who have enjoyed the Arden fragrances.


The goal of this website is to show the present owners of the Arden company how much we miss the discontinued classics and hopefully, if they see that there is enough interest and demand, they will bring back your favorite perfume!


Please leave a comment below (for example: of why you liked the perfume, describe the scent, time period or age you wore it, who gave it to you or what occasion, any specific memories), who knows, perhaps someone from the company might see it.

Friday, August 30, 2013

My Love by Elizabeth Arden c1949

My Love by Elizabeth Arden: launched in 1949.




Fragrance Composition:


So what does it smell like? It was classified as a vivacious aldehydic floral fragrance for women. I have no published notes on this composition. I am using a 1950s perfume nip to tell you what it smells like. Lots of roses and jasmine.
  • Top notes: aldehydes,  bergamot, lemon, orange
  • Middle notes: orris, violet, jasmine, lily of the valley, geranium, ylang ylang, Bulgarian rose
  • Base notes: galbanum, vetiver, oakmoss, vanilla, benzoin, sandalwood, patchouli, castoreum, musk
The fragrance starts off with nose tickling aldehydes, then some bright citrusy notes of bergamot, orange and lemon, followed by a soft floral heart of violet and jasmine, carroty orris, soapy lily of the valley and Bulgarian rose, pungent geranium and banana like ylang ylang, resting on a chypre base laden with dry and dusty green notes of galbanum, vetiver and oakmoss. A sweetened balsamic note of vanilla and benzoin keep the fragrance from being too verdant and bitter. Woodsy notes combining sandalwood and patchouli round out the base along with sensuous castoreum and musk. This is actually pretty nice, do try to get some if you enjoy old school aldehydic chypres.

Only when applied to the skin, can I truly appreciate the fragrance, smooth and complex, it reveals each facet beautifully from the top to the base notes. On paper, I mostly smell the aldehydes, the citrus and green florals notes with only a hint of the animalic notes.

Bottles:

The perfume was housed in a clear glass bottle made by Verreries Brosse. The base is a squat urn shape with a feather made of frosted glass as the stopper, imitating a fanciful inkwell and plumed pen.

photo by Perfume Bottles Auction.

c1948 Elizabeth Arden My Love purse perfume bottle, glass with metal screw cap, metal caging, red jewel, enameled label, box. 2 3/4 in. Photo by Perfume Bottles Auction.




Sketch, 1949:
"MY LOVE PERFUME ... romance for your love at Christmas, in its plumed bottle and gold lined box 5 guineas."


Canadian Saturday Night: A Magazine of Business & National Affairs - Volume 67 - Page 30, 1951:
"My Love Flower Mist ... the newest, lighter-than-air version of this enchanting fragrance ... in the crystal perfection of an exquisite bottle . . . $6.00 From France, comes Elizabeth Arden's newest, most romantic fragrance . . . the exquisite plumed bottle."

Home Journal, 1953:
"My Love for your love. Be- ribboned, a tiny replica of the plume bottle rests on a red velvet cushion. Elizabeth Arden. $3."


Harper's Bazaar, 1954:

"Christmas Pyramid encloses jeweled Perfum- air of Blue Grass Perfume ... 2.50; My Love or On Dit ...3.00 to $33.00. Repetition Sequence of Elizabeth Arden Perfumes created, bottled, sealed in France . . . Blue Grass . . . 5.00 to 25.00; My Love or On Dit pound jar of bath salts $19.50. Elizabeth Arden's On Dit perfume now in her new, classically simple "Repetition" bottle. An ounce, $17.50."

The New Yorker, 1954:
"My Love, the gift of gifts! Distilled in France, bottled there, too, in golden shine and splendor, Elizabeth Arden's romantic My Love Perfume has a gentle pervasiveness and great elegance."


Programme, 1955:
"Elizabeth Arden's three great Perfumes . . .Each fragrance is packaged alike in a distinguished mauve package, bearing the symbol of its identity. . . the plume for My Love . . . the spirited horse for Blue Grass . . . the lovely intaglio head for On Dit."

Consumer Reports, 1956:
"My Love (Elizabeth Arden, NYC). Good. Not very lasting. 7/32 oz., $6; 1 oz, $17.50; 2 oz., $27.50."

The New Yorker, 1960:
"It is the Perfume Atomizer in a cut-crystal and gilt flacon that has been expressly designed to hold your choice of the great French fragrances by Elizabeth Arden: Mémoire Chérie, No. 450, My Love, Blue Grass and Valencia. 3.50."

Mademoiselle, 1962:
"As romantic as its name suggests, Elizabeth Arden's My Love perfume comes in a distinctive plume-topped bottle. A light and appealing floral scent, one-quarter ounce. $8.50."

Cue, 1965:
"Elizabeth Arden's Memoire Cherie, in a soft lilac color, is flower- shaped, comes in a good-sized cake at $2.75, or three at $7.50. The same beauty house's My Love soap, ideally heart- shaped and a delightful shade of rose- red, may be had in hand size in boxes of three ($3.50) or bath size (three for $5.00). Perfume, cologne and bath powder in these same two Arden scents, so aptly named ."

Fodor's Europe, 1970:
"Elizabeth Arden. Her best known are "Memoire Cherie"; "On Dit"; "My Love"; and the ever popular "Blue Grass" which was created in Paris."

Fate of the Fragrance:

Discontinued, date unknown. Still being sold around 1970.

Note: Please understand that this website is not affiliated with the Elizabeth Arden company in any way, it is only a reference page for collectors and those who have enjoyed the Elizabeth Arden fragrances.  

The goal of this website is to show the present owners of the Elizabeth Arden company how much we miss the discontinued classics such as My Love and hopefully, if they see that there is enough interest and demand, they will bring back the perfume! 

Please leave a comment below (for example: of why you liked the perfume, describe the scent, time period or age you wore it, who gave it to you or what occasion, any specific memories), who knows, perhaps someone from the company might see it.



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